Marine Corps Training: Enlistees obtaining the skill sets they need to defend our country

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Flustering yells and commands were heard at Roosevelt Park in Longmont on Saturday, August 10. A passerby may have thought that something alarming was happening, however, there was a much more inspiring event occurring than one would perceive.  

Purple Heart Memorial at Roosevelt Park. Photo By Josh Limon

In light of the Purple Heart Appreciation Day the Colorado area Marine Corps Recruiters and Officers were out preparing new enlistees for their vigorous trip through boot camp. 

Enlisting in the military is a big step in life but also one that can change the course of an individual. 

The recruiting process begins with a pre-enlistee who has the simple question of “What can the military do for me?” The recruiters answer this question with roles and journeys that will illuminate new possibilities for advancement in aptitude and prowess.

Training to defend our country is no easy task. To be fully prepared, each of these recruits spends significant time strength training and team building. Additionally, the skills acquired during training build leaders, bridge friendships, and teaches life lessons.

Majors, sergeants, and commanding officers joined the recruits during their training in order to model, guide, and encourage the trainees. These leaders were seen running alongside and even carrying trainees through portions of the course. 

A Recruiter shown helping carry a Recruit to the finish line Photo By Josh Limon

“This kind of support for the recruits is an astonishing show of devotion towards their success in the marine corps, we owe it to them,” says Major Mark Saville, commanding officer. 

Local Recruiter Sergeant Mark A. Williams, was one leader who was showcasing just how in tune he was with his recruits at this event. He was focusing on those who were falling behind and coaching them on techniques to utilize in order to complete each training more efficiently.

“The most important part of these trainings is that each one of my recruits understands and is able to overcome anything that lies ahead of them,” says Williams.

Williams is not only a guide for the mental and physical awareness of these young men and women, but he is also a role model for his recruitees due to his devotion to his work and his journey towards the prosperity of others around him.

Williams was previously stationed at 29 palms in California, however, has recently moved to Longmont with his wife of five years Jocelyn. He was a field radio operator for almost seven years. His job consisted of maintaining communications and keeping his unit safe by ensuring radio security on the front line.

When faced with the opportunity to either become an officer or a recruiter, Williams made the decision to incorporate himself in the transformation of youth in his new community. “I wanted to change people’s lives and help them reach their full potential,” says Williams.

Currently, Williams leads ten young men who are residents of Longmont and when speaking with these recruits there was nothing but smiles and visible aspiration for their recruiter.

SGT Mark A. Williams kneeling in front of his Recruits Photo by Josh Limon

The commitment and enthusiasm shown by these Marine Corps leaders is shaping future generations of military leaders right here is Longmont.


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